2014 USCAP Companion Meeting

Sunday, March 2, 2014 — 8:30am-12:00 noon
San Diego, California, USA

Renal Transplant Pathology and Renal Manifestations of Stem Cell Transplantation:
Ultrastructural Correlations

TimesTitlePresenters

8:30am-9:00am

Transplant glomerulopathy

Handout (pdf, 12.8mb)

Volker Nickeleit, MD

Volker Nickeleit, MD
  UNC School of Medicine
Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA

Adil M. Hussein Gasim, MD

Adil M. Hussein Gasim, MD
UNC School of Medicine
Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA

9:00am-9:30am

Recurrent and de novo glomerular disease in allografts - critical role of electron microscopy

Handout (pdf, 10.3mb)

Lorraine C. Racusen, MD

Lorraine C. Racusen, MD
Johns Hopkins University
Baltimore, Maryland, USA

9:30am-10:00am

Renal pathology associated with stem cell transplantation

Handout (pdf, 1.8mb)

Megan L. Troxell, MD, PhD

Megan L. Troxell, MD, PhD
Oregon Health and Science University
Portland, Oregon, USA

10:00am-10:30am

Coffee Break

Juan Valdez, et al

Juan Valdez, et al
¡Disfrute de un buen café!

10:30am-11:30 am

Viral infections in transplant recipients:  the targeted role of diagnostic electron microscopy

 Handout (pdf, 7.4mb)

Sara E. Miller, PhD

Sara E. Miller, PhD
Duke University Medical Center
Durham, North Carolina, USA

Harsharan Singh, MD

Harsharan K. Singh, MD
UNC School of Medicine
Chapel Hill,
North Carolina, USA

11:30am-12:00 noon

Mesangial repair by stem cells: Insights from the research laboratory

 Handout (pdf, 15.1mb)

Guillermo A. Herrera, MD

Guillermo A. Herrera, MD
Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center
Shreveport, Louisiana, USA

Moderators
Sara E. Miller, PhD

Sara Miller, PhD
Duke University Medical Center
Durham, North Carolina, USA

David Howell, MD, PhD

David N. Howell, MD, PhD
Duke University Medical Center
Durham, North Carolina, USA

ACCME Statement

  1. The topic for this Companion Meeting was determined jointly by the Executive Committees of the Society for Ultrastructural Pathology and the Renal Pathology Society.
  2. The role of electron microscopy and other diagnostic modalities in the analysis of renal transplant dysfunction represents an area of keen current interest and importance in the renal and ultrastructural pathology communities.  End-stage renal disease is epidemic in our society, and renal replacement therapy via transplantation offers both great benefit to patients and formidable challenges for pathologists, including extended graft survival (a boon for the recipient but a substrate for the development of novel graft pathologies), transplantation in highly sensitized recipients, and a bewildering array of new immunosuppressive therapies that may predispose to the development of unusual infectious complications and toxic effects.  In a similar vein, stem-cell transplantation offers great hope to patients with congenital or iatrogenic deficiencies in hematopoietic cells, and may ultimately facilitate repletion of all or part of an injured kidney.  In some instances, however, therapeutic stem cell infusion may have unintended injurious effects on a variety of organs, including the kidney.  Electron microscopy is one of many methods needed to unravel the positive and negative effects of stem cells.
  3. The target audience for this Companion Meeting includes renal and ultrastructural pathologists, hematopathologists whose practices include stem-cell and bone-marrow transplant recipients, and any general or subspecialty pathologists whose work touches on these areas, either as episodic practitioners or supporting colleagues.
  4. Participants will receive a comprehensive review of the following topics, including contributions of ultrastructural pathology:
    • Analysis of transplant glomerulopathy
    • Diagnosis of recurrent and de novo glomerular disease
    • Detection of opportunistic infections, particularly with viruses, in transplant recipients
    • Understanding of injurious effects of stem-cell transplantation on the kidney
    • Exploration of novel approaches to repair and reconstitution of renal tissues using stem cells